Back Draft Shutter Ducting Part
  • Systemair 4 inch back draft shutter 2 web
  • 83202
  • 83212 back draft shutter 6inch 150mm
  • Systemair 8 inch back draft shutter 2
  • 83232 back draft shutter 8inch 250mm web
  • 83233 back draft shutter 12inch 315mm web
  • Systemair 4 inch back draft shutter 2 web

Back Draft Shutter Ducting Part

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Choose your size:

4 Inch (102mm)

£9.95 £9.95
Back Draft Shutter Ducting Part
  • Systemair 4 inch back draft shutter 2 web
  • 83202
  • 83212 back draft shutter 6inch 150mm
  • Systemair 8 inch back draft shutter 2
  • 83232 back draft shutter 8inch 250mm web
  • 83233 back draft shutter 12inch 315mm web
  • Systemair 4 inch back draft shutter 2 web

Back Draft Shutter Ducting Part

Back Draft Shutters are a great way to help prevent air from coming into your room from outside when your extraction system is turned off. Carbon filters are the most popular odour control method among growers, and with good reason, but carbon filters do rely on duct fans. If for any reason your duct fan is inactive, back draft shutters are a great safety net for stopping air coming into your grow-space via your extraction system and pushing smells out through unfiltered nooks and crannies.

  • Easy to install
  • Robust build quality
  • Sizes available to match all standard sized ducting

Contains:

1 x Back Draft Shutter in the diameter of your choice

How the Back Draft Shutter Works

The Back Draft Shutter is a cylindrical insert that can be fitted into the ducting of your extraction system to stop air from escaping from the grow area when the duct fan is turned off. Inside the cylindrical insert is a centrally mounted support which accommodates two sprung shutters which resemble butterfly wings. When air movement is created by your duct fan, the shutters open up to allow airflow to continue on to the outlet point. As soon as the duct fan is turned off, the lack of air movement triggers the shutters to close up. It should be noted that the shutters may have a very slight impact on the number of cubic metres of air moved per hour by your duct fan, though the effects will be fairly negligible.

We recommend that your extraction system is run continually. For instance, in situations where temperatures are dropping too low, duct fans should not be turned off, but should instead be regulated to lower their output with a fan speed controller. However, it's advisable to plan for potential worst case scenarios, and it is always possible that your extraction system may at some point be inactive for a period of time. This could be for maintenance reasons or it could be due to a power cut or other failure.

As your extraction system is usually responsible for removing odours from the air via a carbon filter, an inactive duct fan can lead to smells escaping from your indoor garden. In the event that this happens, having a back draft shutter fitted into your ducting helps to stop unwanted odours from finding their way outside, with the shutters acting as a barrier between the grow area and the exterior.

How to use a Back Draft Shutter

The Back Draft Shutter needs to be installed near the outlet point of your extraction system. It can be connected to flexi ducting with a suitably sized duct clip or fitted to rigid ducting and other connection segments using a suitably sized female to female coupling. The female to female coupling is slightly wider than the size of both standard ducting and the backdraft shutter, and can fit between the two to create a join which can then be sealed using aluminium duct tape.

Ensure that it is installed so that it is facing the appropriate direction to match the airflow of the duct fan. Positioning it the wrong way will mean that the shutter doors are permanently closed.

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